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Yoshi's Oakland

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Dining Reservations

Student Discounts

Dinner:
Monday-Wednesday
5:30pm to 9:00pm

Thursday-Saturday
5:30pm to 10:00pm

Sunday
5:00PM to 9:00PM
*Open 2 hours before the show

Happy Hour:
Mon-Sat
4:30-6pm



Yoshi's Oakland
510 Embarcadero West
Jack London Square
Oakland, CA 94607
Phone: 510.238.9200


Jazz Club
click to enlarge

Jimmy Mulidore NY Jazz Band
feat. Richie Cole & James Tormé

October 18, 2013


Friday, October 18
8pm $25

Jimmy Mulidore - alto, soprano and tenor saxophones, clarinet, bass clarinet
James Tormé - vocals
Richie Cole - alto saxophone
Uli Geissendoerfer - piano
Kenny Seiffert - bass
Santo Savino - drums


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Born in Youngstown, Ohio, Jimmy took up the saxophone at the age of ten. Shortly thereafter, he added the classical clarinet, studying with one of the best teachers around, Albert Calderone. He spent his high school years frequenting the Cleveland jazz clubs soaking up the influences of such greats as James Moody, Miles Davis, Sonny Rollins and Clifford Brown. When he was old enough, his summers were spent on tour with Billy May, Hal McIntyre and Ralph Marterie. At Ohio State University, he was chosen solo clarinetist for their orchestra.

Impatient with his progress at Ohio State, Jimmy took off for New York’s Julliard School of Music where he studied theory and composition with Hall Overton. While studying, he often sat in with Phil Wood’s group at the Pink Elephant. In the late fif ties, Jimmy and bassist Scotty La Faro began a trip to Los Angeles that included a stop in Las Vegas. It proved to be a turning point in Jimmy’s life —he stayed on in Vegas while Scotty went on to L.A.

Jimmy’s career blossomed in his new home. He worked with the Red Norvo Quintet; Carl Fontana’s group; a band that included Sweets Edison, Leroy Vinegar and Jackie Wilson; and with Georgie Auld. He also lent his talents to some very special recordings — “Louie Bellson ‘Live At The Thunderbird, ”Red Rodney’s “Super Bop,” albums by Sinatra, Streisand and Nat King Cole and, the one of which he’s most proud, a flute solo on Elvis Presley’s “American Trilogy.”

Jimmy met Presley through Joe Guercio, then the Las Vegas Hilton’s musical director. When Guercio left the Hilton, Jimmy was chosen to succeed him as musical director for both the Hilton and Flamingo Hotels. Through those years of conducting for such stars as Louis Armstrong, Ann Margaret, Gladys Knight and Olivia Newton-John, Jimmy kept in touch with his old friend Phil Woods. In 1974 and ‘75, when Woods was based in L.A., Jimmy commuted regularly from Las Vegas to study with him. So, while his first love is still the sax (alto and soprano), Jimmy’s impeccable style comes through just as lovingly on the English horn, flute, clarinet and bassoon. His rainbow of talents is exciting displayed on this first solo album.

Now, get comfortable at your ringside table and, no matter what instrument he’s playing, let JIMMY MULIDORE take the lead.

Multi-Award winning eOneMusic recording artist James Tormé is a uniquely gifted singer whose music infuses older classics with contemporary influences, and haunts newer songs with his timeless throwback renditions. The young singer's musical repertoire, which he calls the New American Songbook, explores all corners of popular music history and appeals to young and old audiences alike.”

The young singer's debut album, Love For Sale has already reached #2 on iTunes Jazz and #3 at Amazon Jazz as well as #5 at US Radio in the Jazz category. Eight different songs from Love For Sale have charted in 6 different countries, with a variety of songs getting considerable radio play internationally. In August, Jazz FM (UK) featured Love For Sale as their 'Album Of The Week'. Tormé is “the best male jazz singer to come along in the last 20 years” according to Chuck Mitchell, head of eOne’s Jazz/Adult department, and former long-time president of Verve records. Mitchell adds, “Like his dad, James should never let a good song get past him.”