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Yoshi's Oakland

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Dinner:
Monday-Wednesday
5:30pm to 9:00pm

Thursday-Saturday
5:30pm to 10:00pm

Sunday
5:00PM to 9:00PM
*Open 2 hours before the show

Happy Hour:
Mon-Sat
4:30-6pm



Yoshi's Oakland
510 Embarcadero West
Jack London Square
Oakland, CA 94607
Phone: 510.238.9200


Jazz Club
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ZIGABOOGALOO: A Celebration of Legendary Funk Drummer Zigaboo Modeliste with an All Star New Orleans Funk Revue

Mar 19-Mar 21, 2010


Read about Zigaboogaloo in the Chronicle RIGHT HERE

ZIGABOO MODELISTE
MAC REBENNACK (a.k.a. Dr. John)
NICHOLAS PAYTON
GARTH WEBBER
DONALD HARRISON
DAVID BARARD and more

Fri 8pm SOLD OUT & 10pm $35
Sat 8pm SOLD OUT & 10pm $35
Sun 2pm (Kids Matinee) SOLD OUT
Sun 7pm $35


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JOSEPH "ZIGABOO" MODELISTE

Joseph “Zigaboo” Modeliste is a Master Drummer, Rhythm-Innovator, Percussionist, and a New Orleans Legend, the most highly acclaimed drummer ever to hail from the Crescent City.  Ziggy’s creativity has been a wellspring of Funk Influence for Three decades of all musicians and a great many Hip-Hop samplers.  His innovative work as a member of the Internationally Acclaimed R & B group, “The Meters” as well as his side work with artists like Keith Richards, Robert Palmer, and Dr. John has garnered him an unparalleled level or respect among musicians and fans.  Ziggy’s style is unique; he is a master of creating Funk Grooves and new concepts of Funkdrumming.  He is especially known for his syncopated rhythms and his unique second line Funk styles, which has been sampled, imitated and copied many times over.

Ziggy recorded on all the Original LP’s with “The Meters” and is sampled many times over from artists such as Musiq, Queen Latifah, Run DMC, NWA, Ice Cube, Salt N’ Pepa, Cypress Hill, EPMD, Public Enemy, A Tribe Called Quest, Beastie Boys, Naughty by Nature, Tweet just to name a few.  Ziggy is  a BMI award winner for Young Gunz, “Can’t Stop Won’t Stop” and also Ziggy’s drum sound  provided the main loops for Amerie’s “1Thing” nominated for 2 Grammy’s which also reached the R & B charts at #1.

Ziggy has written over 200 songs individually and collectively with “The Meters” that display his songwriting genius and distinctive Funk Styles.  This collection of songs has been released on over 36 albums nationally and internationally.  His tunes have also been in movies such as “Two Can Play That Game”, “Jackie Brown”, “Drum
Line”, “8 Mile”  a Nike Commercial for Footaction and most recently the TV show, Ludicris VS Tommy Lee onPlanet Green  and the  movie “Hancock”

Ziggy released his first solo CD in 2000”Zigaboo.com” which has been reviewed as one of the most outstanding comeback records of the year!  “I’m on the Right Track”  just released in 2004(special guests, Dr. John, Bernie Worrell)  demonstrates the quote that “Modeliste is the most brilliant American Funk percussionist of the Contemporary Era!”    King of the Funky Drums, Percussion maestro, known as the “Godfather of Groove” Ziggy Modeliste takes you to funk depths no one could possibly reach!

MAC REBENNACK

Biography written by Richie Unterberger (allmusic.com)

Although he didn't become widely known until the 1970s, Dr. John had been active in the music industry since the late '50s, when the teenager was still known as Mac Rebennack.

A formidable boogie and blues pianist with a lovable growl of a voice, his most enduring achievements have fused New Orleans R&B, rock, and Mardi Gras craziness to come up with his own brand of "voodoo" music. He's also quite accomplished and enjoyable when sticking to purely traditional forms of blues and R&B. On record, he veers between the two approaches, making for an inconsistent and frequently frustrating legacy that often makes the listener feel as if the "Night Tripper" (as he's nicknamed himself) has been underachieving.

In the late '50s, Rebennack gained prominence in the New Orleans R&B scene as a session keyboardist and guitarist, contributing to records by Professor Longhair, Frankie Ford, and Joe Tex. He also did some overlooked singles of his own, and by the '60s had expanded into production and arranging. After a gun accident damaged his hand in the early '60s, he gave up the guitar to concentrate on keyboards exclusively. Skirting trouble with the law and drugs, he left the increasingly unwelcome environs of New Orleans in the mid-'60s for Los Angeles, where he found session work with the help of fellow New Orleans expatriate Harold Battiste. Rebennack renamed himself Dr. John, the Night Tripper when he recorded his first album, Gris-Gris. According to legend, this was hurriedly cut with leftover studio time from a Sonny & Cher session, but it never sounded hastily conceived. In fact, its mix of New Orleans R&B with voodoo sounds and a tinge of psychedelia was downright enthralling, and may have resulted in his greatest album. 



He began building an underground following with both his music and his eccentric stage presence, which found him conducting ceremonial-type events in full Mardi Gras costume. Dr. John was nothing if not eclectic, and his next few albums were granted mixed critical receptions because of their unevenness and occasional excess. They certainly had their share of admirable moments, though, and Eric Clapton and Mick Jagger helped out on The Sun, Moon & Herbs in 1971. The following year's Gumbo, produced by Jerry Wexler, proved Dr. John was a master of traditional New Orleans R&B styles, in the mold of one of his heroes, Professor Longhair. In 1973, he got his sole big hit, "In the Right Place," which was produced by Allen Toussaint, with backing by the Meters. In the same year, he also recorded with Mike Bloomfield and John Hammond, Jr., for the Triumvirate album.



The rest of the decade, unfortunately, was pretty much a waste musically. Dr. John could always count on returning to traditional styles for a good critical reception, and he did so constantly in the 1980s. There were solo piano albums, sessions with Chris Barber and Jimmy Witherspoon, and In a Sentimental Mood (1989), a record of pop standards. These didn't sell all that well, though. A more important problem was that he's capable of much more than recastings of old styles and material. In fact, by this time he was usually bringing in the bacon not through his own music, but via vocals for numerous commercial jingles. It continued pretty much in the same vein throughout the 1990s: New Orleans super sessions for the Bluesiana albums, another outing with Chris Barber, an album of New Orleans standards, and another album of pop standards.

In 1994, Television did at least offer some original material. At this point he began to rely more upon cover versions for the bulk of his recorded work, though his interpretive skills will always ensure that these are more interesting than most such efforts. His autobiography, Under a Hoodoo Moon, was published by St. Martin's Press in 1994, and in 1998 he resurfaced with Anutha Zone, which featured collaborations with latter-day performers including Spiritualized, Paul Weller, Supergrass, and Ocean Colour Scene. Duke Elegant followed in early 2000. Additional albums for Blue Note followed in 2001 (Creole Moon) and 2004 (N'Awlinz: Dis Dat or d'Udda). Sippiana Hericane, a four-song EP celebrating his beloved hometown of New Orleans in the wake of Hurricane Katrina, arrived in November of 2005. Mercernary, an album of covers of songs made famous by Johnny Mercer, appeared on Blue Note in 2006. City That Care Forgot followed in 2008.