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Yoshi's Oakland

Dining Reservations

Student Discounts

Dinner:
Monday-Wednesday
5:30pm to 9:00pm

Thursday-Saturday
5:30pm to 10:00pm

Sunday
5:00PM to 9:00PM
*Open 2 hours before the show

Happy Hour:
Mon-Sat
4:30-6pm



Yoshi's Oakland
510 Embarcadero West
Jack London Square
Oakland, CA 94607
Phone: 510.238.9200


press reviews

THE 11 BEST NEW NORTHSIDE PLACES TO EAT
by Susan Dyer Reynolds
NorthSide San Francisco

YOSHI’S SAN FRANCISCO
1330 Fillmore St. (near Eddy), 415-655-5600, http://sf.yoshis.com/sf/restaurant
   

Famed chef Andre Soltner says he is not an artist, but rather a craftsman. At Yoshi’s, executive chef Shotaro “Sho” Kamio proves his skills as a craftsman in an artful setting worthy of the chicest corner in Manhattan. Housed on the ground floor of the Fillmore Heritage Center, and the anchor of the long-awaited Fillmore Jazz Preservation District, Yoshi’s is the best thing to happen to a Northside neighborhood in a long time. On a visit with friend and fellow Northside San Francisco columnist GraceAnn Walden, I watched a couple walk hand-in-hand down glistening, rainy Fillmore Street, touched by the soft glow of twinkling white lights from the trees above, and duck into the lobby, where a diverse crowd waited for the first show of the evening in the 400-seat jazz club. The 3,500-square-foot restaurant, like the club across the lobby, was designed and built from the ground up. It is as impressive as it is stunning, with soaring 45-foot ceilings dripping with long, organically shaped rice paper lanterns and gossamer draping. The Zen-like lounge up front is the kind of place I could stop by several times a week for a few pieces of pristine sushi and some sake. Deep blue glowing glass curves around an upstairs lounge that opens to the club’s mezzanine. Below it, the real focal point: an enormous well-equipped, large-staffed kitchen that would make the Iron Chefs green with envy. There, Kamio is the maestro of a passionate culinary orchestra, turning out beautiful, modern Japanese cuisine that is more complex than it appears. Every ingredient shines on its own, yet there is an eloquent sense of harmony within each dish that I have encountered in only a few restaurants.
 


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